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20121001
20121009
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KPIX (CBS) 15
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English 15
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15
CBS
Oct 1, 2012 5:00pm PDT
is defiant as police investigate the weekend fire that targeted his law offices. joe vasquez with the mayor declaring he won't be intimidated. joe? >> reporter: you can see the damage on the law office behind me, and now we're learning of yet another arson fire reported today just a few blocks away. the new fire at a storage facility behind the village cocktail lounge was called in just after 6:00 this morning. investigators say it appears that the arsonist successfully torched the shed outback, destroying the contents, and see the torch marks on the windowsills? that appears to be another arson attempt at another store next door at a strip mall, but that attempt failed. the new fire is three blocks away from the fire that ripped through the law offices of vallejo mayor osby davis on saturday morning. police are not sure whether the two arsons are related. in the immediate aftermath of saturday's fire, mayor davis had tears streaming down his cheeks. >> whatever attempts are necessary to identify and arrest the persons responsible for this malicious, cowardly act, i'm sure they will do. >>
CBS
Oct 1, 2012 6:00pm PDT
. >> reporter: today he showed a face of resolve. he did say that his law office has been the target of vandalism in the past, specifically rocks thrown through the windows. the mayor clearly believes its some kind of message of intimidation. >> let me make it very, very clear. it has failed. i am nowt not now, nor will i ever be, intimidated by such cowardly acts of conduct. >> reporter: vallejo police are still saying they do not know who caused this. >> i think there could be. until we know for sure, we have to look at it in those terms. >> reporter: there's some criticism from some aspects of the community here for supporting the police in some officer-involved shootings recently. but police are not saying whether that might be the motivation for this fire. they're not citing any evidence whatsoever of the so-called domestic terrorism. now that there's been a second arson just down the street, the question comes up, could this just be a firebug that has absolutely no statement whatsoever to make? reporting live in vallejo, joe vazquez, cbs 5. >>> the other big story we're follow
CBS
Oct 2, 2012 6:00pm PDT
pretenses. >> reporter: the state says no can do. >> there is no mechanism right now in state law to have us refund money to the foundation. we have reached out to them. we would like to have a conversation with them about that. we would like to keep that partnership alive. >> they have never tried to reach us and there hasn't been any email contact either. >> reporter: the briggs say the damage is done in trust and money. another $20 million that was pledged is evaporating. >> we had big donors lined up and we don't have them anymore as a result of this fiasco. >> reporter: if they can't get their refunds, the volunteer group wants a memorandum of understanding with the state that their money, the $279,000 they already wrote a check for, can only be used for henry coe state park. that was the presumption that a lot of people, allen, donated their money on. that's where nent the money to -- that's where they want the money to stay and they may need it at some point. >> the state legislature commended this group. where is the state legislature on this if there is no mechanism to refund the mo
CBS
Oct 7, 2012 7:30am PDT
interest in law to tell people about this? >> we do believe genetically engineered foods are a problematic, health concerns, leads to allergies and health effects showing up in the studies that have been done. environmental problems. yesterday, the new york times had a story about the massive increases in pesticide use over the last 15 years of genetically engineered crops, tied to the crops. >> is your goal to end genetically modified foods? >> it's to give consumers the choice, that's how the market is suppose to working. we decide, voting with dollars, making choices about what we eat and feed families, about what we want in the food system. >> the bottom line for families listening, is this going to increase the cost at the grocery store? the no on campaign says yes. it's going to cost hundreds of extra dollars a year to require the labels. >> they have no evidence to back that up. we think no increased cost will come of the law, it didn't happen in europe and didn't happen when we asked for trans fats. it gives them 18 months to do it. it's a straight forward labeling law. >> yes on
CBS
Oct 2, 2012 5:00pm PDT
for the san rafael city council to approve a strict new antismoking law. >> the only person who spoke against it believes that it was it wasn't strict enough. >> reporter: even this smoker is for it. >> i don't mind the laws at all. you know, just because people smoke doesn't mean it's fair for other people who don't want to smoke, the secondhand smoke. >> reporter: the ordinance bans smoking in apartments, condos, parks, all sidewalks and pedestrian areas downtown, bus stops, restaurant patios, and even cautions against actors smoking on stage. one smoker says it's illogical. >> it's ludicrous. just because they are still selling tobacco and all the smoke shops and all the stores. >> reporter: the city says its goal is to improve public health and reduce litter. and litter is a big issue. in two months, one group collected 230,000 cigarette butts which is why they won't ban ashtrays. it's okay to smoke on a sidewalk if you are walking. you just can't stay in one place. >> we're hoping that it's a self-enforced -- that people will ask others to put out their cigarettes. our goal is not to hav
CBS
Oct 8, 2012 7:00am PDT
. i went to law school and wanted to work in service. i served in the white house under president carter. i went back and practiced law. i wasn't that great of a lawyer and not a great demand of service. i decided to do something different. i start ad company and it took off. so i did get fortunate to make more money than i probably can spend and therefore i'm committed to giving away the bulk of it. >> when you started your company you were 38 years old. you were telling me in the green room that believes kids today, young people today should try many things before the age of 30 because before 30 you really don't know. very few mark zuckerberg. >> very few people know what they want to do in their 20s. people should find what they enjoy not what their parents want to do and you have to experiment. you should try many different things. i did many different things. i was in government, i practiced law. not until your mid-30s do you know what you want to do. >> gayle, he's like your son and like me, a duke graduate and has done a lot of wonderful things. >> he's on the cover of "for
CBS
Oct 3, 2012 5:30pm PDT
supplements because federal law classifies them as food not drugs. products are required to be safe but the f.d.a. only monitors them after they're on the market. when it comes to proof, supplement makers are only required to say research has been done, they are not required to show it to the f.d.a. the natural products association-- the main trade group of the supplement industry-- issued a statement saying: the investigators looked at 127 supplements that claim to boost the immune system or help with weight loss. none-- none-- met all of the f.d.a.'s recommendations for proving the products actually work. >> pelley: and we should mention, jon, the report we're referring to was produced today by the department of health and human services. there's another medical story that we're following tonight, jon, a deadly outbreak of meningitis. it has spread to five states, 26 people have been infected, four have died. a suspected source is tainted steroid injections that is used to treat back pain. the medication came from a pharmacy in massachusetts that issued a recall last week. jon, what have yo
CBS
Oct 3, 2012 7:00am PDT
finally know his real name. >> authorityies say he's a harvard law school graduate who has been wanted by the fbi for a very long time. 48 hours correspondent erin moriarty has the story. >> john donald cody has been on the run since 1984 when he suddenly fell off the grid around the same time he was accused of fraud. cody and a man named bobby thompson are one in the same person and allege he's responsible for one of the largest charity scams in u.s. history. the many faces of a man who called himself bobby thompson, a master of disguise that authorities believe was hiding a checkered past. last april, thompson, posing as a retired canadian mounty, was resting at this house in oregon. >> not dressed up in a fancy suit, just a regular person. >> being pursued by authorities in a nine-state cross country manhunt as the alleged master mind behind an organization called the united states navy veterans association, a fake charity that took in $100 million in donations over an eight-year period. authorities say the money never got to the people it was supposed to. instead, with a reputation
CBS
Oct 5, 2012 6:00pm PDT
for the next court appearance. >> her daughter's presence in law enforcement custody at the safeway was not enough for her to return to the scene. so i didn't think the court or the people would be comfortable that she would return to court. >> erico is being held on $500,000 bail. she is due back in court on october 16th to enter a plea. >>> a bay area man's death overseas has triggered an international health scare. cbs 5 reporter cate caugiran explains it all traces back to a sick bat. >> reporter: it's the county's first death fr rabies in almost two decades. >> rabies still does exist in california. however, it is rare. >> reporter: a 34-year-old contra costa man died from the disease in switzerland in july. once the cdc found out, a full blown investigation started. >> there were four people that we identified that may have had contact with his saliva or other body fluids. three of those did and we offered post-exposure prophylaxis or treatment to them and they received those injections. >> reporter: investigators discovered four months before he died, the man came in contact
CBS
Oct 7, 2012 6:00am PDT
as a vegetable on school lunch menus. they wrote a lot of the health care reform law. thurber estimates $9 billion is spent every year on lobbying and related advocacy, a top lobbyist can make millions the influence of business in washington d.c. is the third largest business after government and tourism. i think there's probably 100,000 people in the industry, not lobbyists specifically but in the industry supporting all of that in washington. >> reporter: and what do clients expect from their lobbyists? we asked gary lauer, ceo of a $150 million california firm called e-health insurance, a website that lets customers shop for health insurance from 180 companies. >> i was interested in getting some lobbyists, a, who had high credibility and, b, who could frankly get some doors open so we could explain what the situation was and what we think the remedy would be. >> reporter: specifically he was seeking to change the rules of health care reform so low-income americans can use government subsidies to buy insurance througcompanies like e-health. lobbyist lanny davis agreed to represent e hea
CBS
Oct 4, 2012 5:00pm PDT
a carpool, drive with people, if you are planning to come to events here in the city. >> reporter: law enforcement will be out in force. if you can't take bart, muni, caltrain or anything else, you don't drive, here's a simple tip. fill your gas tank! sounds like a big doh, but you would be surprised. >> traffic slows down, people start to idle. they are on the road for a little longer than they anticipated. just make sure you have a full tank of gas before you get started. >> reporter: you run out of gas on the road, you're stuck. tow trucks are going to get stuck in traffic, too. but just in case, there will be extra tow trucks out there this weekend. but fill your tank. in san francisco, mike sugerman, cbs 5. >>> all that traffic could put bart on track to break some records. ken bastida is live with mobile5 to show us how the transit agency is gearing up for the weekend. ken. >>> reporter: hi, liz. we're up here on the platform of the daly city bart station. 419,000 people rode bart yesterday. that is a record. you had the oracle people in town, the as game over in oakland. but the
CBS
Oct 5, 2012 5:00pm PDT
with the prosecutor that she could be a flight risk. >> her daughter's presence in law enforcement custody at the safeway wasn't enough for her to return to the scene. so i didn't think the court or the people would be comfortable that if we released her today that she would come back to court just to make a court appearance. >> reporter: miss keelin allegedly abandoned her 10-year- old daughter while caught shoplifting last week fleeing all the way to nevada where she was discovered. she was just returned to santa clara county last night. she is due to be back in court on october 16th to enter a plea so for now, she is going to remain in santa clara county on $50,000 bail. reporting live in morgan hill, len ramirez, cbs 5. >>> other bay area headlines. san francisco's new roman catholic leader is on probation for the next three years. archbishop salvatore cordileone pleaded guilty this week to misdemeanor reckless driving stemming from his dui arrest in august down in san diego. at his installation mass yesterday, the archbishop called the incident a terrible error in judgment. >>> the dr
CBS
Oct 8, 2012 5:00pm PDT
if we did there's nothing illegal about that. >> reporter: so there's nothing against the law about gaming the system. but what is there about the system that allows it to be gamed here in california as opposed to other states? >> reporter: the problem is we use a blend of gasoline not used anywhere else in the country. as a result when we get into a supply problem, we can't import gasoline used in other parts of the country to smooth out that shortage. >> reporter: and while the governor's order to allow the winter blend gas to come in is no long-term answer to the problem, at this point the public will take any relief they can get. >> it all counts. 22 bucks, huh? oh, not really cool, huh? >> reporter: and that message was heard here and in sacramento and it was heard in washington. and ken, you're right. we have seen investigations like this before. and they haven't come up with anything other than california's got its own blend of gas, that's how we do it, and if the system starts to crack, that's when the prices spike. but nonetheless, calls for investigations, you think it mig
CBS
Oct 5, 2012 7:00am PDT
the laws of supply and demand to go into overdrive. signs like this are creating sticker shock all over california. while $5 gas isn't the norm yet, analysts warn the average price for regular could soon surpass the world's high topping $4.37 a gallon. the uptick is troublesome, but temporary. california's drivers will have reason to give thanks for lower prices by thanksgiving. for "cbs this morning," bill whitaker in los angeles. >>> gas prices have been rising in other states as well because of the shortage of fuel. one exception, gas prices in texas fell by four cents a gallon last week. norah? >> there was a clear winner in wednesday's presidential debate. at least when it comes to getting all of our attention. mitt romney used public tv's big bird to make a point about spending. and, as jeff glor reports, that has triggered an avalanche of criticism. >> reporter: it was not the first time pbs has been targeted. it was, maybe, the most prominent platform. >> i'm going to stop subsidy to pbs. i'm going to stop other things. i like pbs, i love big bird actuall
CBS
Oct 4, 2012 7:00am PDT
and brings out law enforcement, often including a s.w.a.t. team. it happened in computer gamers, conservative bloggers and even singer miley cyrus. someone called the police to her home in august with a 911 call reporting shots fired. it was yet another hoax but one with serious consequences. perpetrators face a $10,000 fine and up to three years in prison if caught. >> officers put thur lives on the line. every time they get a call, they're taking their lives at risk. >> he was not home wednesday morning but later tweeted from the set of his sitcom saying "safe and sound at two and a half men. don't miss tomorrow night at 8:30. >> you have a home here as long as you want. >> reporter: it may have been a hoax but that's no reason to pass up an opportunity for a little self promotion. for cbs this morning, ben tracy, los angeles. >> self promotion aside, it's just not funny. so far they have a hard time catching the people who are responsible for doing that. >> i never heard of that before. first time i heard of it. >> that's why we're here at "cbs this morning." that's what we do. >> yes. >>
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15